Stressed Out In College? These Tips Will Help!

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For many students, getting to college is only half the battle. Adjusting to a new world with new freedoms and responsibilities can be just as stressful as the effort it took to get to college in the first place.

The number one cause for dropping out of college during freshman year is mental health and stress-related issues. What makes dealing with these problems that students face when adjusting to college is that many students suffering through stress feel like they have to do it alone. While most colleges offer some type of mental health services clinic and numerous opportunities to talk with other students to find ways through these trying first days, many students feel that theirs is a battle to be fought privately, or else show their struggles as a sign of weakness or unpreparedness.

But the truth is that the best way to deal with the adjustment to college is to have a good game plan and be willing to lean on others who are there to support you. Reaching out and making connections with other students and taking full advantage of student service resources can make a tremendous difference in adjusting to college life.

Here are a few easy tips to help establish a strong groundwork in your freshman year that will support you all the way through graduation.

Create a Routine

Having a focused calendar is just one step in creating a positive routine. Take the time when starting college to establish good habits that balance studying and classwork with extracurricular activities and a social life. There are so many things possible for students to do on a college campus that it can seem overwhelming. But by creating a routine early on, you’ll be able to get the most out of what college life has to offer.

Don’t Get Behind On Deadlines

Perhaps the most difficult adjustment when starting college is having to take personal responsibility for not only your actions, but your studies. Start off on the right foot by making sure that you are aware of the variety of deadline dates that you’ll encounter. From class papers to financial aid filings to scholarship or grant renewals, having a calendar that lays out all of your deadlines will help you stay ahead of the game. Make sure to keep that calendar in a place where you will frequently see it, a constant reminder to stay focused.

Go to Class!

Sure. It seems obvious, but when freshmen are faced with the reality that mom and dad aren’t there to get them out of bed and to school on time, the promise of a cozy bed sounds a lot more promising than walking through the snow from your dorm to class. Remember why you are in college: to get an education and prepare yourself for a career. Your instructors will likely hold your absence against you when it comes time for grades, and they won’t be following up to make sure you received the materials covered in class.

Get to Know Your Professors

College is a new place, but just like in high school your instructors aren’t there to intimidate you, but to help you. Don’t be afraid to introduce yourself to your professors and take a moment to get to know them. This way, you’ll feel more comfortable asking them questions when there are problems in coursework or other aspects of the class. The best time to do this is during an instructor’s office hours, where they are focused on having one-to-one or small group interactions focused on student needs.

Stay Healthy

Just as your mom and dad aren’t there to get you out of bed each day, they aren’t there to tell you when to stay in bed, either. The pace of a college student’s life can get hectic. And even with the best-planned routines, pushing too hard can have a negative effect on your health. Know when to lay low and recover. You don’t get bonus points for showing up to class sick and you’re likely not going to pay close attention anyway. Most schools (and even many dorms) will offer some form student health services to provide you with medical care. Make sure to take advantage of them instead of trying to tough out health problems on your own.

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