Didn’t Get Into Your First-Choice School? Here’s How to Move On

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It’s that time of year when mailboxes fill up for high school seniors anxious to start their college careers. College acceptance letters are a fantastic reward and validation for years of focus and hard work for students ready to move on to the next phase of their life. But what about those other moments when a student must deal with not being accepted to the school of their dreams? Here are some tips to dealing with what could otherwise be a real downer:

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It is okay to be disappointed, but don’t blame yourself. If a student doesn’t get into their first-choice school, it might hurt. Take the time to let feel disappointed, be it an hour, a day or a week. But don’t let the negative feelings linger. Often, not getting an offer to enroll at a school has little to do with an individual student. While their GPA and test scores may have been good enough, the increasing numbers of changing factors that admissions officers have to consider (from an increased number of early decision and early action applications, geographical balance issues and more) can put applicants unfairly in the crosshairs. Add in the ever-growing importance of college rankings that reward schools for the number of students they reject, while punishing the same schools for students that turn down acceptance offers, and a student might feel that schools are looking for reasons to say “no.”

Focus on what’s to come, not what might’ve been. If a student has applied to more than one school, it’s likely they will receive an acceptance offer from another school. Instead of dwelling on the schools that didn’t feel they were the right fit, students should focus on, and get excited about, those schools that see them as a great partner in learning.

Know that college is more about what one does than where one goes. While there are schools with names that will open doors after graduation on reputation alone, no school defines a student. More than just attending a school, college is about what a student does once they get there. Regardless of the school they attend, students should keep an eye on using the opportunity to discover their strengths, passions and develop the skills that will give them a rewarding, life-long career.

The college admissions process is technical, complicated and ever-changing. No matter where the college decision process takes a student, they should always remember that the opportunity to continue and develop their education is a rare and unique opportunity, no matter where they go to school.

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