Campus Visits

Be a College Application Ninja With These Three Summer Tips

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College applications can seem daunting. For many high school seniors, the process happens in a rush during their senior year as they apply to schools that they think they’d like, but haven’t taken the time to research.

By creating a college application strategy before senior year, students can more easily target the schools that best meet their educational plans. More importantly, it can help them move through the college application process more smoothly, avoiding the chaos thanks to the research and planning they’ve done ahead of time.

Incoming seniors looking to be college application ninjas (and those juniors… and even sophomores… who want to be even greater ninjas when their time comes) know that the work they put in now will put them that much farther ahead when it comes time to start the application process. Here are three tips to start students on the ninja path this summer:

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School Fit is a Two-Way Street

Finding a school that best “fits” with a student’s needs is important. Aspects such as a school’s location, average class size and available programs of study can strongly influence whether or not a student will succeed in their future plans at that school. Taking the time to look deeper at a school’s programs will help students understand where they have the best chance to get the most out of their education.

But college isn’t just about what the student wants. It might seem like a basic idea, but often students apply to schools without having a strong understanding of the type of student that the school is seeking. It’s important to know if a student’s current grades, test scores and extra-curricular activities make them a good match for the schools where they are planning to apply. Conduct research to determine if students meet all the admissions requirements before starting the application process.

Have a List and Learn as Much as You Can

Once students have a list of target schools, getting to know more about a school can give the extra information that will help students decide whether or not to commit the time to apply. Campus tours are the best way to experience life on campus and summer offers the flexibility to turn travel into college research. For those campuses that might be farther away, virtual tours on college websites give a taste of what to expect.

Get Organized

To really hit the ground running in the fall, students should do a little prep work before starting applications. From creating application accounts with usernames and passwords and creating a timeline for campus visits, to researching any available college application fee waivers and making a master calendar of key financial aid and scholarship deadlines, having a game plan ahead of time will make the application process less chaotic.

 

College Fairs Offer Students a Great Tool for Finding College Fit

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The new starting date for filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is just about here. Completing the FAFSA, though, isn’t the end of the road for college preparation. Throughout the school year, students have opportunities to visit with colleges and find out more about what each school offers and how that school does (or doesn’t) relate to a student’s plan for their future.

Making that match is called “college fit” and it can mean the difference between getting the most of education after high school and frustrations that could lead to transferring schools or, worse, not completing a degree.

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The good news: Colleges offer tours that allow students to see the campus, talk to professors and students and get answers to questions about their education. Even better: Students can get much of that information without even leaving their own high school thanks to college fairs held throughout the year. These events, often held at the local high school, include representatives from schools both near and far looking to put their best foot forward for prospective students.

College fairs are the first step toward finding college fit and students who attend college fairs will get a head-start on making a smart choice on where to go to school. As with anything, approaching the event with a game plan will help students get even more out of college fairs.
Start with these five tips:

  1. Is a college strong in a student’s major? Not all high school students are going to have an idea of what their major will be, but it helps to have some idea of what they might be interested in as a career. If students have an idea, they can ask schools about programs in those areas. Some colleges specialize in certain majors or are known for having strong programs in particular fields.
  2. Does a school’s size matter? Larger schools often mean more students in classes (sometimes over 100 students), but a bustling community. Smaller colleges might have fewer students, but that might mean more direct interaction with teachers and smaller class sizes. A student can talk to representatives at a college fair to get an idea of the school’s size and start to consider which appeals to them.
  3. What’s college life like? While a visit to the actual campus will give students the best idea of what life is like at a given school, college fairs frequently include representatives from schools who are either current students or recent graduates. Of course, these representatives will always look to emphasize what makes their school better than the rest, but talking to college students is a great way for high school students to get an early idea of what life is like in college.
  4. Take all the materials available. Schools visiting college fairs will have lots of giveaways: stickers, squeezeballs, pens, and more. But the most important materials to take away from college fairs are the informational brochures that talk more about the school. These materials might not answer every question a student might have about a school, but they will frequently include websites or links to other resources to learn more if interested.
  5. Make notes, take it all in, but don’t rush to any decisions. College fairs are the introduction to schools for many students and representatives are chosen by schools to present their school in the most attractive way possible. It’s great if students are inspired to learn more about schools after a college fair. But rather than eliminate schools from their list, students would be better off ranking a list of schools that grabbed their attention and listing the reasons why that school might be a good fit. From there, it’s easy to start researching further into which schools should really make the cut.

For more tips and advice for preparing and planning for college, as well as financial aid and college information, check out Iowa College Aid’s “Your Course to College.” You can read, download or order your own copy on our website.

 

For Storm Lake Student, GEAR UP Iowa Sparks Lifelong Changes

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In celebration of National GEAR UP Week, we’re celebrating the students, facilitators and families that make GEAR UP Iowa successful in building college-going cultures in schools, homes and communities. Lessly Ortega is ninth-grade student from Storm Lake, IA.

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Earlier this summer, Ortega was chosen to participate in the GEAR UP Iowa Student Summit, which brought together students from all of GEAR UP Iowa’s 12 school districts throughout the state to Grand View University in Des Moines. Students learned interpersonal and leadership skills to not only help them on the road to educational success after high school, but build and grow those skills in their schools. Ortega shares the immediate impact the event had on her:

I wasn’t born into a family where people grew up to go to college. All we have going for us is a simple high school education with work following after that. But ever since I was little I knew I wanted to break that cycle. I’m not a person who likes being average or going with the flow, I aspire to be someone who people will remember for generations to come. I’ve shared this dream with my friends and every one of them told me that was impossible and I should give up before I waste my time. You wouldn’t believe how close I was to giving up. That was until I went to the GEAR UP Iowa Summit, an event that completely changed my life.

When I first heard about GEAR UP Iowa, all I knew was that it meant free money for college, which I was grateful for considering the expensive cost of tuition. But I never would have thought of the lasting impact it would have in my life. The GEAR UP Iowa  Summit has been one of the best experiences of my life. It showed me how GEAR UP Iowa is much more than free money. I was able to learn how to better myself and how to become a better leader both in school and in life. The Summit gave me lifelong information which I put to work the day I got home from it. I went to all the places I could think of for volunteer opportunities. I was able to work at a retirement home, a kids club, and, the best experience of all, a girls camp as a counselor. I’m beyond grateful to GEAR UP Iowa for giving me the confidence and tools I need to be able to go out into my community and to be able to make a difference in myself and my community.

GEAR UP Iowa means hope in the future. I will continue on my path of greatness where ever that shall be. Thank you so much for giving me this opportunity.

Hit Senior Year Running With These College Prep Tips

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All that hard work is about to pay off! Senior year is the last, and most important, year of high school. Those students and families who have followed our “Your Course to College” tips on preparing for college during their freshman, sophomore and junior years will be ready to roll right into senior year preparations.

For those who haven’t… Fear not! There’s still time to put together a senior year checklist that will help students and families plan for education after high school without getting overwhelmed. Here are some tips to help stay on the path to college in this crucial year:

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  • Review coursework with your school counselor to be sure you have taken (or are scheduled to take) all the courses you will need for admission to your preferred colleges.
  • If you plan to take the ACT or SAT again to improve your score, make sure to register for a date that is at least two months ahead of the application deadlines for all of the colleges and scholarships you are considering.
  • Prepare a final list of colleges and submit admission applications. Most early decision and early action college applications are due in October 1.
  • Complete and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at
    www.fafsa.gov as soon after October 1 as possible. The FAFSA is the first step in the financial aid process. Check with your school of interest for its priority financial aid deadline.
  • Ask your high school to send your official transcripts to the colleges where you are applying for admission.
  • Compare acceptance letters and financial aid awards. Upon admittance, each college or university listed on your FAFSA will send you an award letter that will include the financial aid that you are eligible to receive.
  • Take AP exams for any AP subjects you studied in high school. Some colleges may
    award college credit for the course work based on your exam score. Go to www.collegeboard.org for AP exam information.
  • Decision time! Choose your college and notify them by mailing your commitment deposit check.
  • Talk to those who have been there! Iowa College Aid’s “Education Empowers” video series provides testimonials of students who faced (and overcame) challenges in getting to college.

For more tips and advice to help prepare, plan and succeed in college, check out Iowa College Aid’s “Your Course to College.” This free guide offers advice on everything from finding the right college and narrowing down a major to showing families the steps to finding financial aid and even loan repayment programs for after graduation. “Planning for Our Futures” is a publication produced by Iowa College Aid, Treasurer of State and the Iowa Department of Insurance that takes a closer look at the financial options for families looking to prepare for education after high school.

Put Your College Plan Into Action With These Tips for Juniors

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Planning can make all the difference between calm and panic. That certainly holds true for putting together a plan for getting to college. We’ve already discussed the easy ways that freshmen and sophomores can be set on the path for college.

Come junior year, it’s time for the rubber to hit the road. With only two years before high school graduation, students and families can put their college plan into action early enough to not find themselves scrambling come senior year. Iowa College Aid’s “Your Course to College” offers tips that will help families in their junior and senior years of high school execute their college plans to perfection.

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Here are a few things to get on the calendar for junior year to help with college planning:

  • Now is the time to really focus on your career and college research. Determine which colleges offer programs that interest you.
  • Take the PSAT in the fall of your junior year to be considered for a National Merit Scholarship. Plus, it’s good practice for the SAT!
  • Attend college fairs and go on college visits. Call ahead to schedule appointments with financial aid and admissions offices.
  • Take the SAT or ACT in the spring and have the official scores sent to the schools that interest you. Download a free ACT preparation booklet from www.act.org. Find free official test prep for the SAT through the College Board and Khan Academy at www.khanacademy.org/sat.
  • Ask for letters of recommendation. Identify teachers, counselors, employers or other adults who can attest to your academic achievement and abilities and ask that they write letters of recommendation for scholarship applications or admissions applications, if needed.

For more tips and advice on planning for, applying to and succeeding in your education after high school, check out “Your Course to College.” Iowa College Aid also publishes a guide for families looking for more information on financially planning for their student’s education. “Planning for Our Futures” is produced in conjunction with Iowa Insurance Division, Treasurer of State and the Iowa Department of Education. Both publications are free to families.

Yes, You Can Prepare for College as a Freshman!

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Starting high school can seem like the beginning of a whole new world and, certainly, one where college seems far away. But the truth is that in four short years, today’s freshmen will be the graduating Class of 2020.

We’ve already talked about ways that students can start thinking about college by taking college visits or researching scholarships early. Once the school year starts, though, it becomes important to think for the future, but also take the steps necessary to succeed in this new transition to high school. Iowa College Aid’s “Your Course to College” guide not only offers tips and information for students preparing to start their final year of high school, but also gives advice for those students just starting high school.

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Here are some tips from “Your Course to College’s” Student Checklist for freshmen looking to succeed this year, while still planning for future success.

  • Meet your counselor. He or she is there to help you succeed in high school and to help set you up for success after graduation! Set up a meeting to talk about your plans for high school and the future.
  • Get involved. Many admissions officers look for well- rounded students who participate in school activities and are involved in their communities throughout all years of high school.
  • Set up a college savings account, if you  don’t already have one, or continue to add to an existing account. College Savings Iowa is sponsored by the State of Iowa and can be started with as little as $25. Find more information at www.collegesavingsiowa.com.
  • Choose the right class schedule. Find out about college entrance requirements for the schools you’re interested in.
  • Find out about Advanced Placement (AP) and other honors-level courses. If your high school does not offer AP courses directly, they may provide online access to courses through the Iowa Online Academy.
  • Fill your summer with volunteer activities and work opportunities that can give you a better idea of what type of career you would like to pursue.

Check out the full Four-Year Student Checklist here and sign up to receive the 2016-17 edition of “Your Course to College” here. Iowa College Aid’s “Planning for Our Future” (produced in conjunction with Iowa Insurance Division and Treasurer of State’s office) offers more detailed information and advice on financial planning for a student’s education at all ages (even starting in elementary school or earlier). Order a copy here.

Find A School That Fits Your Needs During Iowa Private College Week

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Though Iowa Private College Week concludes today, Iowa’s private, not-for-profit colleges continue to offer opportunities to students from around the world to benefit from small class sizes and focused programs that lead to more students graduating in four years than larger Regent universities.

Today, we finish our week-long look at the schools participating in Iowa Private College Week, featuring a sneak preview of each school’s listing in Iowa College Aid’s upcoming 2016-17 “Your Course to College” publication (review earlier posts from Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday). This annual guide helps students prepare for college with academic and financial tips to put together an effective plan for education after high school. The guide also includes informational listings for all of Iowa’s colleges and universities. For more information about “Your Course to College” visit Iowa College Aid’s website.

St. Ambrose University, Davenport, IA

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Enrollment: 3,300; Tuition & Fees: $28,870; On-Campus Room & Board: $9,000 (varies); Est. Books & Supplies: $1,200; Priority Deadline for Aid Filing: March 15; Types of Programs: Engineering, Nursing, Teacher Education, Physician Assistant, Engineering, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Pre-Law, Graphic Design, Speech- Language Pathology, Business and Healthcare Sales

Rated among the top universities in the region by two national ranking publications, St. Ambrose University is a coeducational, liberal arts university affiliated with the Diocese of Davenport. Students received more than $48 million in financial aid last year and the new BEE Finished in Four Years Plan guarantees timely degree completion. Maintaining an 10:1 student-to-faculty ratio, St. Ambrose offers professional and liberal arts undergraduate majors, master’s and doctoral programs. No classes are taught by graduate assistants.
In addition to strong academics and a growing study-abroad program, students enjoy a dynamic campus that features some of the nicest residence halls in the Midwest, a wide range of varsity and intramural sports, more than 80 student clubs and organizations — and a reputation for amazing personal attention. A new Wellness and Recreation Center is scheduled to open fall, 2017.

St. Luke’s College, Sioux City, IA

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Enrollment: 245; Tuition & Fees: $19,960; Est. Off-Campus Room & Board: $8,180; Est. Books & Supplies: $1,253; Priority Deadline for Aid Filing: March 1; Types of Programs: Health Science, Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care and Clinical Lab Sciences

St. Luke’s College has a 113-year history of educating health care professionals with bachelor’s degree programs in nursing and health science; associate degree programs in nursing, radiologic technology and respiratory care; certificate programs in medical laboratory science, phlebotomy and clinical pastoral education; and advanced specialty programs in CT, MRI, sonography and mammography.

Located on the campus of UnityPoint Health-St. Luke’s, the College provides programs with experience-based clinical learning in a hospital environment. The curriculum is designed with a foundation in the biological, physical and social sciences, integrated with theory and experience in the clinical lab setting. The College emphasizes hands-on, patient care learning. Student involvement with patient care begins early in the first year of study.

University of Dubuque, Dubuque, IA

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Enrollment: 2,200; Tuition & Fees: $28,700; On-Campus Room & Board: $9,124; Est. Books & Supplies: $950; Priority Deadline for Aid Filing: April 1; Types of Programs: Accounting; Aviation; Biology; Business; Computer Graphics & Interactive Media; Health, Wellness & Sport; Nursing; Philosophy; Psychology; Religious Studies; Sociology; Speech Communication

The University of Dubuque is a private, coeducational professional University with a focus in the liberal arts. Our commitment to nurturing the mind, body, and spirit, as well as encouraging students to explore their fullest potential, is part of a rich Christian heritage that dates back to the University’s founding in 1852.

UD’s welcoming interfaith community comprises one of the most diverse campuses in the Midwest consisting of students from 35 states and 20 countries. Over the last 15 years, the University has invested over 200 million dollars in renovations and new construction to academic buildings and residence halls. The University awards more than $15 million in student scholarships annually. Students are academically focused, technologically motivated, and professionally prepared to meet 21st century needs. Opportunities are experienced through nationally recognized programs in Aviation, Business, Computer Graphics/Interactive Media, Education, Environmental Science, Nursing, and a new Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies.

Wartburg College, Waverly, IA

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Enrollment: 1,537; Tuition & Fees: $38,380; On-Campus Room & Board: $9,460; Est. Books & Supplies: $1,110; Priority Deadline for Aid Filing: February 1 (Prospective Students), March 1 (Current Students); Types of Programs: Liberal Arts and General, Teacher Preparation

Wartburg is a private, Lutheran, liberal arts college with an enrollment of 1,537 students, including 132 international students from 55 countries. Dedicated to challenging and nurturing students for lives of leadership and service as a spirited expression of their faith and learning, Wartburg focuses on a traditional curriculum enriched by a variety of learning opportunities. Through travel, study abroad, experiential learning, service learning, civic engagement, community service, undergraduate research, and close work with individual faculty, Wartburg students embark on a journey of discovery to embrace their passions, unlock their potential, and realize their purpose.

Notably, 93 percent of Wartburg graduates complete their degrees within four years, and 98 percent are placed in jobs or graduate schools within six months of graduation.

William Penn University, Oskaloosa, IA

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Enrollment: 1,921; Tuition & Fees: $24,510; On-Campus Room & Board: $6,667; Est. Books & Supplies: $1,206; Priority Deadline for Aid Filing: July 1; Types of Programs: Liberal Arts, Nursing, Pre-Professional, Teacher Preparation

William Penn University offers a quality liberal arts education that is firmly rooted in leadership development. Professors who care about your personal goals, combined with opportunities for campus and community involvement, build an educational foundation that will prepare you for success!

Founded by Quaker pioneers, William Penn University embraces traditional values of integrity, simplicity, compassion, ethical practice, acceptance, tolerance and service. It is also one of the most diverse campuses in Iowa, with students from 42 states and 20 countries.