College Life

Your Course to College: How to Rock Campus Visits

Posted on Updated on

With helpful tips on preparing for, and succeeding in college, Iowa College Aid’s annual “Your Course to College” has become a valuable resource for students, families and high school counselors throughout Iowa. The 2017-18 edition of “Your Course to College” will be available later this month, so we’re taking the opportunity to preview some highlights and some of our favorite tips found in the guide. This week, ways to research college visits and get the most out of your trip to a prospective campus. To find more previews and sign up to receive your copy of “Your Course to College” in print or download, visit our “Your Course to College” page at IowaCollegeAid.gov.

Visiting a college is the best way to find out if a particular school is the right fit for your future. Attending a college that doesn’t meet your academic, financial and personal needs can create real challenges to achieving your educational and career goals. While a campus tour won’t tell you everything you need to know when trying to determine college fit, it will go a long way to letting you know both what college is like and what life would be like for you on that campus. Here are some tips to get the most out of your college visit:

  • Some colleges might be too far away. Start with virtual campus tours. Check the college’s website or look into online sites such as ecampustours.com and campustours.com.
  • Take a campus tour, check out housing options and explore the surrounding area.
  • Schedule a visit with the financial aid office.
  • Get a feel for college life by eating in a campus cafeteria and staying overnight in campus housing.
  • Sit in on a class that interests you.
  • Talk to a professor in your intended field of study.
  • Ask current students about campus life.
  • Read the campus newspaper.
  • Visit with advisors and members of clubs and activities that interest you.
  • Document each visit, including any feelings you have.

Becoming #FutureProof: GEAR UP Student Leaders Embrace National Conference

Posted on Updated on

Each year, the annual GEAR UP Youth Leadership Conference brings together GEAR UP students from around the country in an opportunity to engage with each other, learn from their shared experiences and gain an insight to overcoming the challenges that come with preparing for college. Armed with this knowledge, GEAR UP Youth Leaders return to their schools as an example of how to build a college-going culture, showing classmates how everyone can succeed.

Sioux City High School student Rylie Maliszewski served as one of Iowa’s GEAR UP Youth Leaders. Having returned recently from the conference, she shares her experience and the impact that participating has had on her college and educational outlook.

This past week I attended the GEAR UP Youth Leadership Conference in San Francisco, California. I was able to attend this conference thanks to my GEAR UP advisors and coordinators, my wonderful parents, and my mentor, Ms. Ford. Thanks to their hard work and my own, I met so many wonderful people and learned so many new skills that I will use forever. I am beyond grateful for this experience. I met many life long friends at the conference! Many of whom I have talked to everyday since the conference ended. I am so blessed to have been one of 150 students around the nation at this conference. Now that I am home, I want to reflect and share my amazing experience!

On the morning of July 16, my family and I woke up at 2 a.m. to head to Omaha. It was my first time flying and I was very nervous. Luckily, the flight was very smooth and our flight was about an hour shorter than they thought. The view was amazing and I even spotted a waterfall during the flight.

20502706_1447868835293086_1145813437_o

This conference was different than many others.

About a month before the conference began a Facebook group was created. This gave us a chance to meet and engage with other students around the nation attending. A few weeks after a friend of mine created a messenger group, which allowed us all to be ourselves and not worry about being formal. Soon after I created a Snap Chat group which mainly had students who did not have Facebook on it so myself and a few other student could help spread important news! Later on we decided to do group video chats about once a week leading up to the conference. This first chat had about six to seven and our last chat had about 10 to 12.

20446357_1447868965293073_162953359_o

These video chats allowed us to put names to faces which I believed was really cool and, thanks to the Facebook and SnapChat groups, we all recognized each other as the conference began. It was absolutely amazing how close a lot of us were already without actually meeting in person. I even saw a few people before the conference even began.

The first night we did a lot of icebreakers. The following morning at breakfast we had an amazing plenary speaker, Hill Harper, who starred on “CSI: New York,” one of my favorite shows. He talked a lot about the importance of school systems, districts, officials and more, to listen to what the students need from the students and not from outside sources. His speech was truly amazing and very relatable. Monday we worked a lot on making a match between values and behaviors. We also worked on the importance of storytelling and learned the steps in telling a great story. We even had a singing battle.

20426907_1447869048626398_678192484_o

Tuesday came with a lot of fun. We learned about the importance of living “about the line” and also worked on creating our large presentation for the last breakfast plenary. I helped others make their story as best as it could be. Many worked on a skit and the “Show Me What You Got” box. At the end of the night we did a really amazing and touching activity involving our biggest fears and struggles in life and vowing to not let “them” bother us and get to us anymore. It was cool “breaking” my fear/struggle and watching others do the same.

Wednesday was a very sad day for many of us. I had made so many amazing friends from the social media groups and beyond. Our presentation was truly mesmerizing and I was so glad to be a part of it. All of us were so supportive of one another.

After our group presentation, we wrapped things up and said goodbye. During our goodbye and thank you to everyone, I don’t believe there was a dry eye in the room. Every day at this conference felt like a party, we had so many dance parties and battles. I truly am grateful for this experience and the opportunity to meet amazing lifelong friends I miss them all dearly and really hope we will be able to do a reunion soon. I can’t wait to see how my fellow attendees and I use the skills we learned and how our futures end up.

Thank you GEAR UP Iowa for this amazing experience, one that I will never forget. Thank you for allowing my Mom to go with me as well. Thanks to this conference, I am Future Proof! #GEARUPWorks #GUCon

20464428_1447869455293024_166282631_n

Be a College Application Ninja With These Three Summer Tips

Posted on Updated on

College applications can seem daunting. For many high school seniors, the process happens in a rush during their senior year as they apply to schools that they think they’d like, but haven’t taken the time to research.

By creating a college application strategy before senior year, students can more easily target the schools that best meet their educational plans. More importantly, it can help them move through the college application process more smoothly, avoiding the chaos thanks to the research and planning they’ve done ahead of time.

Incoming seniors looking to be college application ninjas (and those juniors… and even sophomores… who want to be even greater ninjas when their time comes) know that the work they put in now will put them that much farther ahead when it comes time to start the application process. Here are three tips to start students on the ninja path this summer:

63975937_Students

School Fit is a Two-Way Street

Finding a school that best “fits” with a student’s needs is important. Aspects such as a school’s location, average class size and available programs of study can strongly influence whether or not a student will succeed in their future plans at that school. Taking the time to look deeper at a school’s programs will help students understand where they have the best chance to get the most out of their education.

But college isn’t just about what the student wants. It might seem like a basic idea, but often students apply to schools without having a strong understanding of the type of student that the school is seeking. It’s important to know if a student’s current grades, test scores and extra-curricular activities make them a good match for the schools where they are planning to apply. Conduct research to determine if students meet all the admissions requirements before starting the application process.

Have a List and Learn as Much as You Can

Once students have a list of target schools, getting to know more about a school can give the extra information that will help students decide whether or not to commit the time to apply. Campus tours are the best way to experience life on campus and summer offers the flexibility to turn travel into college research. For those campuses that might be farther away, virtual tours on college websites give a taste of what to expect.

Get Organized

To really hit the ground running in the fall, students should do a little prep work before starting applications. From creating application accounts with usernames and passwords and creating a timeline for campus visits, to researching any available college application fee waivers and making a master calendar of key financial aid and scholarship deadlines, having a game plan ahead of time will make the application process less chaotic.

 

Need Help With Summer Transition? These Resources Can Help

Posted on Updated on

For students making the transition from high school to college, nagging questions can turn into doubts. Left unchecked, those doubts can turn into the dreaded “summer melt,” where students who accept an offer to attend college don’t manage to make it to campus in the fall, for whatever reasons.

Those reasons can be abundant: From financial concerns and fears about academics to feeling overwhelmed by a larger campus or not knowing how and when to turn in housing applications, there are as many pitfalls for students transitioning to college as… well, there are students heading to college.

If you’re a student heading to college this fall, don’t let the changes ahead psych you out and take you off your game. College is an exciting time with new opportunities and there are many resources for helping with those questions and concerns you might have as you get ready to walk on to your new campus.

Here are some great places to look for answers, support and a confidence boost this summer:

Your College’s Financial Aid and Admissions Offices

Many students feel that once they’ve been accepted to a college that their next interaction with the school shouldn’t come until the fall. The truth is that financial aid and admissions offices are the perfect place to answer questions about tuition, fees, student aid, housing deadlines and more. Much of this will be covered at orientation (make sure that you sign up for it!), but if you have questions before then, a call to your school’s office can lead to a quick answer before it becomes a big issue.

Your College’s Student Organizations

Just as the school’s financial aid and admissions offices want to see prospective students succeed, so to do student organizations. Even though the school year is over, many organizations are already working to help embrace a new class of students, engaging in their community and working to make the transition to college easier. First-Generation students can especially look to these groups for support, advice and a chance to meet new people before even getting to campus. Having a familiar face when you get there makes the move to college that much easier.

Local Colleges

Many of the questions and concerns that students have during their summer transition aren’t unique to a particular campus. For more general questions, you can always call a local college to get insight to other resources or advice on how to move forward in the fall.

Local Organizations

Iowa College Aid’s “Course to College” program works to build community engagement in many towns throughout the state. That means that you may have a local organization in your own backyard that’s looking to help students making the transition from high school to college. Even if there isn’t a group in your town, reach out to local organizations such as United Way, your church or even a mentor or friend who has made the transition to college before you. They’re advice may have more in common with your concerns than you think.

Our Website 

Iowa College Aid’s website offers advice and answers for students facing any number of issues heading to college. From our blog to our video gallery, we can help students feel a little more secure about what awaits them in the fall.

Your Course to College

Iowa College Aid’s annual guide to preparing for, and succeeding in, college offers guidance of the steps that students can take before getting to school. More than that, the guide offers advice from college students on what to expect, as well as an example of average college student’s daily schedule. Getting a heads-up and hearing first-hand from other students can make a big difference in a student’s confidence.

Get Prepared for College Life With These Summer Activities

Posted on

While it may feel like a time to celebrate your accomplishments (and you should), the summer before starting college can have a huge impact on your success as you move forward. Rather than be a potential victim of summer melt, take the time to do these activities to help you arrive at college motivated, excited and prepared.

48229680_student_college

Sign Up for and Attend Orientation

Many colleges have mandatory orientations for incoming students. But even if your school doesn’t require it, try your best to attend anyway. This is especially important if you haven’t been able to visit the college beforehand. You’ll get a chance to see where things are on campus, check out the dorms and eating facilities, and scope out the local amenities. There will likely be special sessions where you can meet faculty, register for classes, get your student ID, and purchase a parking decal.

You may get an invitation to orientation or your college may leave it up to you to register, so be sure to check their website for a schedule. And if possible, bring your parents along. Orientation can be a little overwhelming and it’s nice to have the support. Your parents can also get answers to some of the questions they have, get a feel for where you’ll be spending your time, and possibly have an easier transition when it’s time to let you go.

Find (and Get to Know) Your Roommate

Since many colleges require incoming freshmen to live in dorms, chances are high you’re going to have a roommate and it’s likely the first time you’ll be sharing your living space with someone outside your family. Some colleges use an online roommate finder to try to match you up with someone that shares similar interests, schedules, or study habits. Some colleges host a roommate fair where you can look for a roommate yourself.

Take the time to find out what you’ll need to do and do it as early as possible. Typically, you can start looking as soon as you’ve committed and paid a housing deposit. And if you can find out who your roommate will be early, go ahead and start getting to know them before you get there in the Fall. Communicate via email or text, or friend them on whatever social media they’re using.

Fortunately, living in a dorm lets you avoid some of the hassles you can encounter when living with a roommate. You won’t have to worry about having a roommate who doesn’t pay their rent, for example. The school will take care of that. Still, living with someone can be challenging, so take the time to learn how to spot a terrible roommate before moving in with them and read up on some other good ways to avoid roommate tension.

Register for Fall Classes as Early as Possible

Registering for college classes might start before you even graduate high school. Some college offer early online registration sometime during May. For others, you might have to wait for orientation or, depending on your major, for a meeting with a freshman advisor. You’ll need to check to see how soon you can register for classes. Take a look at the college’s website or call your admissions counselor. That’s what they’re there for.

As soon as you find out when you can register, go ahead and do it. There are couple of advantages to registering early:

  • Classes fill up. While you’re pretty well-assured of getting into your basic required freshman classes, popular electives fill up fast. Registering early means a better chance of getting in.
  • There may be summer reading. Some classes have required reading lists for the summer. Why not go ahead and get started now, since the summer’s just going to get busier.

If you’re having trouble picking classes, or if you haven’t chosen a major yet, read through the course descriptions and get in touch with an advisor who can help you out. If possible, talk to a professor or students in your department of study and see what they recommend. When you choose classes, try to choose a balanced load if you can. Create a weekly schedule that works well for you, consider getting some requirements out of the way, and try to strike a balance between the types of classes you take. It’s not fun getting stuck writing half a dozen papers or getting stuck working out multiple problem sets every night.

Now that you’ve registered for classes, you can start looking at the textbooks you’ll need. It’s possible some professors won’t have decided on a book yet or that some specialty books may not be available early. But for most classes, especially core classes, you shouldn’t have any trouble.

When it comes to buying your textbooks, you have a few choices: buy them new, buy them used, or rent them. Unless there’s no other option, skip buying new books in favor of buying used or renting. Be sure to check out our complete guide to getting cheap textbooks and our readers’ five favorite sites to buy textbooks cheaply. There are even apps out there to help you compare costs.

Spend Some Time with Family and Friends

This summer may be the last time you can get all your current friends together at once, so take the time to build some memories. Throw a party, take a road trip, or if you’re looking for something a bit cheaper, go camping. Just do it early in the summer, because some people may leave for college or jobs earlier than others. And be sure to get any new contact information (like college email and physical addresses) they have so you can keep in touch.

You’re excited to get out on your own, so it can be easy to forget that while your parents are also excited for you, a major phase of their life is ending. And believe it or not, you’re going to miss them when you’re no longer seeing them every day. Get them involved in your plans. If you have younger siblings, don’t forget to show them some love, too. Their lives are also about to change. And there’s one last person to take care of: yourself. You will likely find yourself without nearly as much alone time as you’re used to. Take the time to do some things on your own, even if it’s just binge watching your favorite shows.

Learn Some Life Skills

There are a number of good skills to learn before striking out on your own. We’ve covered a lot of them in the past. Two of the most important skills you can learn this Summer include:

  • Finances. Hopefully, you’ve already got your own checking and savings account at this point and have had some practice using them. If not, sign up now and learn how to use them. Look for a bank that has a presence at your school or at least has in-network ATMs available when you need them. Take time to get a head start on your finances and avoid some dumb mistakes.
  • Laundry. Lots of kids have never really done laundry or any other real cleaning by the time they leave for college. If that describes you, spend some time this summer learning how to do laundry like a boss. Learn how to decipher laundry tags and maybe even download an app to help you out. It’s not too hard and you can practice while you’re cleaning out your closet and getting packed up for the move.

If you take care of all this, you’ll be well on your way to a more organized and enjoyable Fall semester. Depending on your situation, there may be a few other odds and ends you’ll want to take care of, like making an appointment with your doctor, cleaning up your social media sites, and changing your mailing address. But most of all, enjoy yourself!

Knowing How to Avoid Summer Melt Can Help Meet Your Academic Goals

Posted on

For many, summer vacation is the reward for a year of hard work and dedication in the classroom. But for those moving from high school to college, the months between graduation and arriving on campus can be fraught with challenges and distractions that can lead to students not completing their college goals.

“Summer melt” is the name given to those students who, for whatever reason, apply to a college, accept admission, but never arrive after high school graduation. There are many factors that can drive a student toward summer melt. Being aware of a few of those, and taking the steps to stay focused on the college path, can help make sure that the only thing that melts this summer is your ice cream!

17981485_Student_College

Keep in touch with Counselors and Reach out to College Advisers

School counselors are there to help when challenges arise. Before graduation, students should ask high school counselors what resources are available to them in the summer. Need a helpful boost or reminder of why it’s important to get to college? Give your counselor a call!

Colleges are also looking to help students stay on track during the summer transition, many schools can reach out to students by text and email to make sure that the important dates during the summer transition aren’t missed.

Find a Mentor

It’s always easier to tackle a new challenge if you’ve spoken to someone who’s been through it. Community groups, schools and other non-profits offer mentors who can talk to students about the transition to college. But it can be as easy as talking to anyone you know who’s either in or graduated from college. Don’t be afraid to bring up your concerns about the transition when talking to a mentor. These relationships can last beyond the transition to freshman year and can offer a resource for support both in school and down the road. To hear some advice from first-generation students about making the move to college, check out our video “What I Wish Someone Had Told Me.”

Visit the College Website

Your school’s website is a great resource to answer questions you might have before starting school. Everything from student life, financial issues, academics, organizations and more can be found on a school’s website. Take some time to review the website, even before your student orientation. You’ll have a level of expertise that will make the transition to college that much easier.

Look into Placement Testing Before Orientation

Most schools have some sort of placement testing for incoming first-year students. These tests help gauge where students are in math, reading, and writing skills and makes sure students are taking the courses appropriate for their level of understanding in each subject. Some colleges will offer these tests at orientation, others require students to do them online or on-campus before fall semester starts. Students should make sure to contact the college to know when they need to take the tests.

Check College Health Insurance Plans

Many colleges have health insurance plans for students. Students should check their college’s requirements early to see whether it is affordable. Sometimes, colleges will automatically enroll students in the college’s health care plan. If a student already has qualifying insurance, they can usually apply for a waiver. To learn more about transitioning healthcare for students after high school, read the healthcare guide.

Take the time to emotionally prepare

No matter how much you prepare, college is a big change for many people. Whether you’re travelling far away or staying close to home, college is a major step into adulthood, complete with personal responsibilities that may not have been part of your high school routine. The stress of that change can have negative effects, with many freshmen citing it as a reason for dropping out during their freshman year.

If you’re leaving home, take the time to get you (and your family) used to the idea of you not being there every day. And if you’re staying closer to home, start identifying the people you can lean on in times of stress or the ways that you can deal with the pressures of school in a positive way.

Believe in Yourself

The best support students can find to stay on path to college is themselves. Remember: You’ve done the hard part and gained acceptance to college. Your dream of an education, as well as the career and life that comes with it is in your reach. But you can’t get your degree if you don’t show up.

For more tips and advice for planning for, getting to and succeeding in college, check out Iowa College Aid’s Your Course to College.

Use Summer to Your Advantage to Save on College Costs

Posted on

The snow coats are finally put away in place of the short-sleeve shirts. Spring is here, with summer right behind. For high school seniors, the end of years of hard work are within your grasp with the goal of a college education just beyond it. But rather than coasting to the finish line, students looking to save money and hit the ground running once they get to college will find the next few months important.

repaye

“Summer melt” is the term used in higher education to describe students that intend to go to college after high school graduation, but never make it to college in the fall. Their college plans have dripped away like an ice cream cone in the July heat. Here are some tips to stay on track and keep those college plans firm this summer, and even saving a few dollars once you get there:

  1. Don’t fall victim to “senioritis.” The end of high school is certainly in reach, but that doesn’t mean students should take their foot off the pedal when it comes to school. Completing AP or dual enrollment courses in high school can reduce the number of credits that need to be taken in college. Think of it as getting free classes that would otherwise be part of tuition costs.
  2. Plan ahead to avoid changing majors. It’s not out of the ordinary for students to get to college not knowing exactly what they want to do. But changing majors, even once, can add a year or more to a student’s time in college. Use this summer to explore areas of career interest as a volunteer or intern to get a taste of what the day-to-day life in a particular job will be like. It might lead to reconsidering a college major before too much time and money is committed.
  3. Consider summer courses. Just like taking the AP, any courses that can be taken before college will help later. General education, or underclass, units can be taken at local community colleges, often with smaller class sizes and for less money than when a student gets to a college or university. Math is math, no matter where you take it. Why not get a head start now?
  4. Take a part-time job. Working during college can help reduce the amount of money that needs to be borrowed, in addition to providing valuable job experience. Use the summer to help build a nest egg for college expenses.
  5. Research textbook and supply rentals. Course books can be one of the biggest expenses for students once they get to college. While many colleges allow students to rent textbooks instead of buying them, online sites such as chegg.com, eFollett.com, textbooks.com and others can provide other options and the opportunity to compare prices. Getting to know the options ahead of time in school can lead to saving hundreds of dollars come fall.