Summer

Get Prepared for College Life With These Summer Activities

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While it may feel like a time to celebrate your accomplishments (and you should), the summer before starting college can have a huge impact on your success as you move forward. Rather than be a potential victim of summer melt, take the time to do these activities to help you arrive at college motivated, excited and prepared.

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Sign Up for and Attend Orientation

Many colleges have mandatory orientations for incoming students. But even if your school doesn’t require it, try your best to attend anyway. This is especially important if you haven’t been able to visit the college beforehand. You’ll get a chance to see where things are on campus, check out the dorms and eating facilities, and scope out the local amenities. There will likely be special sessions where you can meet faculty, register for classes, get your student ID, and purchase a parking decal.

You may get an invitation to orientation or your college may leave it up to you to register, so be sure to check their website for a schedule. And if possible, bring your parents along. Orientation can be a little overwhelming and it’s nice to have the support. Your parents can also get answers to some of the questions they have, get a feel for where you’ll be spending your time, and possibly have an easier transition when it’s time to let you go.

Find (and Get to Know) Your Roommate

Since many colleges require incoming freshmen to live in dorms, chances are high you’re going to have a roommate and it’s likely the first time you’ll be sharing your living space with someone outside your family. Some colleges use an online roommate finder to try to match you up with someone that shares similar interests, schedules, or study habits. Some colleges host a roommate fair where you can look for a roommate yourself.

Take the time to find out what you’ll need to do and do it as early as possible. Typically, you can start looking as soon as you’ve committed and paid a housing deposit. And if you can find out who your roommate will be early, go ahead and start getting to know them before you get there in the Fall. Communicate via email or text, or friend them on whatever social media they’re using.

Fortunately, living in a dorm lets you avoid some of the hassles you can encounter when living with a roommate. You won’t have to worry about having a roommate who doesn’t pay their rent, for example. The school will take care of that. Still, living with someone can be challenging, so take the time to learn how to spot a terrible roommate before moving in with them and read up on some other good ways to avoid roommate tension.

Register for Fall Classes as Early as Possible

Registering for college classes might start before you even graduate high school. Some college offer early online registration sometime during May. For others, you might have to wait for orientation or, depending on your major, for a meeting with a freshman advisor. You’ll need to check to see how soon you can register for classes. Take a look at the college’s website or call your admissions counselor. That’s what they’re there for.

As soon as you find out when you can register, go ahead and do it. There are couple of advantages to registering early:

  • Classes fill up. While you’re pretty well-assured of getting into your basic required freshman classes, popular electives fill up fast. Registering early means a better chance of getting in.
  • There may be summer reading. Some classes have required reading lists for the summer. Why not go ahead and get started now, since the summer’s just going to get busier.

If you’re having trouble picking classes, or if you haven’t chosen a major yet, read through the course descriptions and get in touch with an advisor who can help you out. If possible, talk to a professor or students in your department of study and see what they recommend. When you choose classes, try to choose a balanced load if you can. Create a weekly schedule that works well for you, consider getting some requirements out of the way, and try to strike a balance between the types of classes you take. It’s not fun getting stuck writing half a dozen papers or getting stuck working out multiple problem sets every night.

Now that you’ve registered for classes, you can start looking at the textbooks you’ll need. It’s possible some professors won’t have decided on a book yet or that some specialty books may not be available early. But for most classes, especially core classes, you shouldn’t have any trouble.

When it comes to buying your textbooks, you have a few choices: buy them new, buy them used, or rent them. Unless there’s no other option, skip buying new books in favor of buying used or renting. Be sure to check out our complete guide to getting cheap textbooks and our readers’ five favorite sites to buy textbooks cheaply. There are even apps out there to help you compare costs.

Spend Some Time with Family and Friends

This summer may be the last time you can get all your current friends together at once, so take the time to build some memories. Throw a party, take a road trip, or if you’re looking for something a bit cheaper, go camping. Just do it early in the summer, because some people may leave for college or jobs earlier than others. And be sure to get any new contact information (like college email and physical addresses) they have so you can keep in touch.

You’re excited to get out on your own, so it can be easy to forget that while your parents are also excited for you, a major phase of their life is ending. And believe it or not, you’re going to miss them when you’re no longer seeing them every day. Get them involved in your plans. If you have younger siblings, don’t forget to show them some love, too. Their lives are also about to change. And there’s one last person to take care of: yourself. You will likely find yourself without nearly as much alone time as you’re used to. Take the time to do some things on your own, even if it’s just binge watching your favorite shows.

Learn Some Life Skills

There are a number of good skills to learn before striking out on your own. We’ve covered a lot of them in the past. Two of the most important skills you can learn this Summer include:

  • Finances. Hopefully, you’ve already got your own checking and savings account at this point and have had some practice using them. If not, sign up now and learn how to use them. Look for a bank that has a presence at your school or at least has in-network ATMs available when you need them. Take time to get a head start on your finances and avoid some dumb mistakes.
  • Laundry. Lots of kids have never really done laundry or any other real cleaning by the time they leave for college. If that describes you, spend some time this summer learning how to do laundry like a boss. Learn how to decipher laundry tags and maybe even download an app to help you out. It’s not too hard and you can practice while you’re cleaning out your closet and getting packed up for the move.

If you take care of all this, you’ll be well on your way to a more organized and enjoyable Fall semester. Depending on your situation, there may be a few other odds and ends you’ll want to take care of, like making an appointment with your doctor, cleaning up your social media sites, and changing your mailing address. But most of all, enjoy yourself!

Knowing How to Avoid Summer Melt Can Help Meet Your Academic Goals

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For many, summer vacation is the reward for a year of hard work and dedication in the classroom. But for those moving from high school to college, the months between graduation and arriving on campus can be fraught with challenges and distractions that can lead to students not completing their college goals.

“Summer melt” is the name given to those students who, for whatever reason, apply to a college, accept admission, but never arrive after high school graduation. There are many factors that can drive a student toward summer melt. Being aware of a few of those, and taking the steps to stay focused on the college path, can help make sure that the only thing that melts this summer is your ice cream!

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Keep in touch with Counselors and Reach out to College Advisers

School counselors are there to help when challenges arise. Before graduation, students should ask high school counselors what resources are available to them in the summer. Need a helpful boost or reminder of why it’s important to get to college? Give your counselor a call!

Colleges are also looking to help students stay on track during the summer transition, many schools can reach out to students by text and email to make sure that the important dates during the summer transition aren’t missed.

Find a Mentor

It’s always easier to tackle a new challenge if you’ve spoken to someone who’s been through it. Community groups, schools and other non-profits offer mentors who can talk to students about the transition to college. But it can be as easy as talking to anyone you know who’s either in or graduated from college. Don’t be afraid to bring up your concerns about the transition when talking to a mentor. These relationships can last beyond the transition to freshman year and can offer a resource for support both in school and down the road. To hear some advice from first-generation students about making the move to college, check out our video “What I Wish Someone Had Told Me.”

Visit the College Website

Your school’s website is a great resource to answer questions you might have before starting school. Everything from student life, financial issues, academics, organizations and more can be found on a school’s website. Take some time to review the website, even before your student orientation. You’ll have a level of expertise that will make the transition to college that much easier.

Look into Placement Testing Before Orientation

Most schools have some sort of placement testing for incoming first-year students. These tests help gauge where students are in math, reading, and writing skills and makes sure students are taking the courses appropriate for their level of understanding in each subject. Some colleges will offer these tests at orientation, others require students to do them online or on-campus before fall semester starts. Students should make sure to contact the college to know when they need to take the tests.

Check College Health Insurance Plans

Many colleges have health insurance plans for students. Students should check their college’s requirements early to see whether it is affordable. Sometimes, colleges will automatically enroll students in the college’s health care plan. If a student already has qualifying insurance, they can usually apply for a waiver. To learn more about transitioning healthcare for students after high school, read the healthcare guide.

Take the time to emotionally prepare

No matter how much you prepare, college is a big change for many people. Whether you’re travelling far away or staying close to home, college is a major step into adulthood, complete with personal responsibilities that may not have been part of your high school routine. The stress of that change can have negative effects, with many freshmen citing it as a reason for dropping out during their freshman year.

If you’re leaving home, take the time to get you (and your family) used to the idea of you not being there every day. And if you’re staying closer to home, start identifying the people you can lean on in times of stress or the ways that you can deal with the pressures of school in a positive way.

Believe in Yourself

The best support students can find to stay on path to college is themselves. Remember: You’ve done the hard part and gained acceptance to college. Your dream of an education, as well as the career and life that comes with it is in your reach. But you can’t get your degree if you don’t show up.

For more tips and advice for planning for, getting to and succeeding in college, check out Iowa College Aid’s Your Course to College.

Use Summer to Your Advantage to Save on College Costs

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The snow coats are finally put away in place of the short-sleeve shirts. Spring is here, with summer right behind. For high school seniors, the end of years of hard work are within your grasp with the goal of a college education just beyond it. But rather than coasting to the finish line, students looking to save money and hit the ground running once they get to college will find the next few months important.

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“Summer melt” is the term used in higher education to describe students that intend to go to college after high school graduation, but never make it to college in the fall. Their college plans have dripped away like an ice cream cone in the July heat. Here are some tips to stay on track and keep those college plans firm this summer, and even saving a few dollars once you get there:

  1. Don’t fall victim to “senioritis.” The end of high school is certainly in reach, but that doesn’t mean students should take their foot off the pedal when it comes to school. Completing AP or dual enrollment courses in high school can reduce the number of credits that need to be taken in college. Think of it as getting free classes that would otherwise be part of tuition costs.
  2. Plan ahead to avoid changing majors. It’s not out of the ordinary for students to get to college not knowing exactly what they want to do. But changing majors, even once, can add a year or more to a student’s time in college. Use this summer to explore areas of career interest as a volunteer or intern to get a taste of what the day-to-day life in a particular job will be like. It might lead to reconsidering a college major before too much time and money is committed.
  3. Consider summer courses. Just like taking the AP, any courses that can be taken before college will help later. General education, or underclass, units can be taken at local community colleges, often with smaller class sizes and for less money than when a student gets to a college or university. Math is math, no matter where you take it. Why not get a head start now?
  4. Take a part-time job. Working during college can help reduce the amount of money that needs to be borrowed, in addition to providing valuable job experience. Use the summer to help build a nest egg for college expenses.
  5. Research textbook and supply rentals. Course books can be one of the biggest expenses for students once they get to college. While many colleges allow students to rent textbooks instead of buying them, online sites such as chegg.com, eFollett.com, textbooks.com and others can provide other options and the opportunity to compare prices. Getting to know the options ahead of time in school can lead to saving hundreds of dollars come fall.

Four Ways to Get Ready For College This Summer (and One Thing To Avoid)

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Summer before senior year: The calm before the storm. For many students about to embark on the final push from high school to college, a busy year awaits. So it only makes sense to take advantage of the slower days of summer to get college applications done before the frenzy of the school year kicks in.

That kind of forward thinking and planning shows a student who has the skills to succeed in college… but also one who might be jumping the gun. Here a few tips on where to move full steam ahead this summer and where to pump the brakes in prepping college applications.

To do:

Start organizing documents for college applications. If an application is screaming for a student to complete it, summer is a great time to start collecting the items needed. Checking transcripts and drafting lists of accomplishments, extracurricular activities and awards will save time later when it’s time to compile them for the application. While there will certainly be more to add to these lists as senior year progresses, it will be easier if the bulk of the work has already been done.

Approach teachers for recommendations. Just as students’ schedules slow down during the summer, teachers have a little more free time on their hands. Rather than approaching a favorite teacher during the early hustle and bustle of the school year, reach out during the summer to lock down letters.

Research and visit potential schools. Many families travel during the summer. Working a college visit into the road trip not only adds some excitement and fun, but also gives students a chance to get a look at their next potential home. Summer sessions won’t be as busy as the regular school year, but many colleges offer enough activities and student presence to give an idea of what campus life will offer.

Get ready for FAFSA. While many have called for a simplified version of the FAFSA, it isn’t coming any time soon. The more work families do to organize financial records ahead of filling out the FAFSA in January, the easier the form will be to complete.

To do later:

Write the college application essay. Many incoming seniors might try to seize the opportunity of summer’s lower homework level to focus on writing their college essay. But just as senior year will bring new memories, summer will offer new experiences, many of them possibly lifechanging, that could make for a fantastic college essay. By trying to lock down an essay now, students will rob themselves of the opportunity to create compelling, and more timely, essays down the road. Of course, writing a draft or compiling a list of ideas is never a bad plan. If inspiration strikes, follow where it leads.

Give Your Kids a College Experience This Summer With College Summer Camps

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For many families, summer presents a doubled-edged sword: the fun and freedom from school  often comes with the common complaint of “I’m bored.” Rather than spend the days off glued to a television, programs abound that not only keep students engaged but can help maintain their educational momentum before the start of the new school year. Summer camps have become big business with programs designed to give students a taste of whatever suits their interests throughout their vacation.

Some camps, though, can do more than keep a student’s attention and mind active. At universities and colleges throughout the state, summer programs aimed at younger students also give a taste of life on a college campus and help instill a “college-going” mindset while still providing fun that stimulates both the brain and the imagination.

Here are just a few of the programs available at campuses around Iowa:

  • The University of Iowa offers programs for students ranging from elementary, to junior and senior high school in subjects as diverse as art, sports, science and communications.
  • Iowa State University’s College of Engineering offers camps throughout the summer introducing elementary school students to engineering concepts and robotics.
  • Kirkwood Community College’s Interactive Camps programs bring students ages 9-15 career exploration through fun, hands-on activities in such areas as Arts and Communication, Business and Career Prep, Culinary, Digital Content Creation and STEM subjects.
  • At four different Des Moines Area Community College branch campuses, students can find classes on everything from carpentry and automotive repair to movie making and 3-D animation.

These programs are just the tip of the iceberg, as many community colleges offer programs for students in an equally wide variety. Families can reach out to their local community college to see what summer “kids college” programs are available in their area.

Tips To Keep Students of All Ages Busy and On Track This Summer

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GEAR UP Iowa Facilitator Tiffany Berkenes offers some advice for students and families looking to stay on track and not lose classroom momentum before the next school year.

When we think of summer, we think of sunshine (enjoying relief from harsh Midwest winters!), spending time outside with friends, trying the newest fried treat at the Iowa State Fair, taking family vacations, and for many kids – a break from school. Although summer is meant to be and should be a time for “kids to be kids,” this is also a period in which our youth experience a significant amount of learning loss, particularly those from lower-income families.

When the doors of the schools close and the routine of daily instruction and educational engagement end for three months, students are suddenly faced with nearly three months of freedom in which they potentially lose two months’ worth of academic knowledge. There’s good news! Kids can still learn; still engage their brain while having fun – sometimes without even knowing it!

For many families, they support and want their children to participate in summer learning; however, accessibility, awareness of options, and affordability present barriers. For that reason, below are a variety of opportunities for all ages that will keep that young mind active and better prepared for entering the next grade-level. Bonus: Many of these experiences are great for networking and to include on college and scholarship applications!

  • Check out your local Boys & Girls Club to see if they offer the Summer Brain Gain, which is available for elementary, middle, and high school students
  • Start a book club with friends or neighbors – now’s the time YOU can choose what you read! Take it outside to your favorite park, and then discuss the books over a picnic
  • High School Students: Apply for the free TRIO Upward Bound college prep program, which offers a 6-week summer experience on college campuses. UB programs in Iowa are hosted by the following: Central College, Simpson College, DMACC-Urban, Iowa State University, University of Iowa, University of Northern Iowa, Western Iowa Tech Community College, and Southeastern Community College.
  • Participate in a summer camp – there are several offered at various places like the YMCA, local museums, sports organizations, churches, dance/gymnastic studios, etc.
  • Ask your school district and public libraries about summer programming – usually it’s free!
  • Visit college campuses! For example, Iowa Private College Week is August 3-7.
  • Volunteer for a place that fits your interests such as the Animal Rescue League, the zoo, library, the hospital, daycare, etc. Find a volunteer opportunity at Volunteer Iowa.
  • Explore free digital learning apps, which you can take outside with you. Khan Academy is one example, and there are more listed here.
  • Break out the old school board games – again, something you can do outside!
  • Sign up for the free Ten Marks Summer Math Program
  • Have a dream job in mind? Ask to job shadow someone!
  • PBS Kids free resources
  • Blog or journal about your summer adventures

8 Ways Juniors Can Get College Ready This Summer

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Finals are wrapping up and summer is calling. But for high school juniors, the steps taken in the summer before their senior year can make the last push before college that much easier (or harder). It’s not an exaggeration to say that this summer is vital for those students who want to be ready for their life after high school.

In between the sun and the fun, here are 8 things that will get students ready for their senior year:

  1. Land a job or internship: There’s a reason this is at the top of the list. College admissions staff want to see students who are involved and interested in their community. And there’s no better way to show that then by actually getting involved with a job, internship or other kind of volunteer work. Double points for working with an organization that reflects a student’s academic or personal passions. Not only will that show dedication and a good work ethic, but also reflect what makes that student unique to grab the attention of college admissions boards. The extra pocket change of a job doesn’t hurt in the summer, either.
  2. Narrow down the college list: Many students should have a list of schools or options after high school that spark their interest. Now it’s time to get a little more serious and start whittling down the list. By taking the time to narrow the focus of schools now, students can more easily create a strategy for applications.
  3. Discuss finances and plan accordingly: Part of a good college fit will be how financial aid and finances play into the future. Talking with the family, and having honest discussions about what will be needed to pay for college, will help everyone prepare for such things as completing the FAFSA, looking into scholarships and grants and speaking with the financial aid department at possible schools.
  4. Start the early drafts of application essays: Not even Shakespeare nailed it on the first draft. A student’s application essay will be their calling card on college applications. Working out those first drafts will be easier in the summer, without the pressure of schoolwork or other demands. Get a version down on paper and then work with a parent, mentor or counselor to start tweaking it into greatness.
  5. Complete the Common Application: If a student already has certain schools in mind that use the Common Application, keeping August 1 on their calendar (when the Common Application becomes available) will allow them to get a jump on the process.
  6. Make an application game plan:  With many admissions options available to students, including Early Action, Rolling Admission, Early Decision and Regular Decision, it’s important to prepare an application strategy for each school. Make a calendar and mark each deadline for schools for which students will apply, as well as transcript and recommendation deadlines.
  7. Plan college trips and schedule interviews: One of the benefits of early preparation is having the time to visit schools and interview with staff at schools in which students are interested. Families taking summer vacations might even consider working a campus trip into the itinerary. Make sure to check with those colleges on a short list if they offer interviews for prospective students, and take advantage of the ones that do. Even if just taking a campus tour, being on campus will offer a great way to learn more about the school and whether it fits a student’s plans. Plus, taking active steps to meet with college staff shows an interest, which can help when applications come around.
  8. Plan for testing and start prepping: Whether students will be taking the ACT, SAT or Subject Tests, it’s important to get test dates on a calendar and start prepping, be it in class, online or with other study materials.